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Transition & Permaculture Hull

Hull Permaculture Network has merged with Transition Hull to form Transition and Permaculture Hull.  For the latest news and contact details, please go to www.transitionhull.co.uk

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Inspirational permaculture related videos

Maybe you’ve just heard about permaculture for the first time. If it’s new to you, welcome to something very exciting! In order to showcase permaculture here at Permaculture Hull, we’ve put together a collection of really inspiring videos for you. They’re not all pure permaculture, but many of the permaculture principles are featured in all of them.

Permaculture originated in Australia in the mid-1970s and has been slowly gaining an faithful following. Now it’s starting to get much more popular and people all around the world are beginning to find out about the fantastic rewards brought about by practising the principles of permaculture. Using them to help transform their surroundings, while caring for the planet and building integrated and resilient ecosystems and communities.  JP

Changing the world the permaculture way – David Holmgren

 

Greening the Desert – Geoff Lawton

 

 
 
The Chickness of the Chicken – Joel Salatin


 
 
Soil Carbon Cowboys

 
 
A farm of the future – Rebecca Hosking

David Holmgren on recognising patterns in nature

For more information:

www.permaculture.org.uk

 


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Bill Mollison – 12 Quotes

12 Quotes in Remembrance of the Father of Permaculture – Bill Mollison (1928 to 2016)

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With so many environmental, social, economic and energetic issues and challenges facing humanity, it seems like the problems are overwhelming. Yet there was one man who clearly understood how the world’s problems could be solved. That was Bill Mollison. Mollison along with co-founder David Holmgren set out a clear guide and blueprint for moving forward sustainably. Mollison born in 1928, co-founded the global permaculture movement, passed away recently ago in his home in Tasmania, Australia.

Mollison understood that the only way forward for humanity is to work in harmony with our natural systems. Mollison along with co-founder David Holmgren developed a system of design that can effectively solve all the worlds problems. Since Mollison and Holmgren wrote the original book, Permaculture One, in 1978, hundreds of thousands, if not millions of people have been trained as permaculture designers and trainers globally.

Mollison considered the ‘father of permaculture’, understood the value of integrated systems of design which encompassed everything from agriculture, horticulture, architecture, and ecology, as well as economy and legal systems for businesses and communities. Much of the work done by Mollison centered around utilising patterns and mimicking natural ecosystems to provide self-maintaining habitat and regenerative ecosystems. These systems also produced significant yields in food, energy and water. The overriding core tenets of permaculture are: Care for the earth, Care for people and Return of Surplus. 

The below quotes from Mollison illustrate his common sense approach to sustainability and his deep understanding of the natural world. Rest in Peace Bill Mollison…..

“Wealth is a deep understanding of the natural world.”

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“The tragic reality is that very few sustainable systems are designed or applied by those who hold power, and the reason for this is obvious and simple: to let people arrange their own food, energy and shelter is to lose economic and political control over them. We should cease to look to power structures, hierarchical systems, or governments to help us, and devise ways to help ourselves.”

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“Though the problems of the world are increasingly complex, the solutions remain embarrassingly simple.”

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“Permaculture is the conscious design and maintenance of agriculturally productive ecosystems which have the diversity, stability, and resilience of natural ecosystems. It is the harmonious integration of landscape and people providing their food, energy, shelter and other material and non-material needs in a sustainable way. Without permanent agriculture there is no possibility of a stable social order.”

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“I teach self-reliance, the world’s most subversive practice. I teach people how to grow their own food, which is shockingly subversive. So, yes, it’s seditious. But it’s peaceful sedition.”

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“The greatest change we need to make is from consumption to production, even if on a small scale, in our own gardens. If only 10% of us do this, there is enough for everyone. Hence the futility of revolutionaries who have no gardens, who depend on the very system they attack, and who produce words and bullets, not food and shelter.”

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“Permaculture is a philosophy of working with, rather than against nature; of protracted and thoughtful observation rather than protracted and thoughtless labor; and of looking at plants and animals in all their functions, rather than treating any area as a single product system.”

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“The American lawn uses more resources than any other agricultural industry in the world. It uses more phosphates than India and puts on more poisons than any other form of agriculture.”

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“If we lose the forests, we lose our only teachers.”

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“Permaculture principles focus on thoughtful designs for small-scale intensive systems which are labor efficient and which use biological resources instead of fossil fuels. Designs stress ecological connections and closed energy and material loops. The core of permaculture is design and the working relationships and connections between all things.”

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“The important thing is not to do any agriculture whatsoever, and particularly to make the modern agricultural sciences a forbidden area – they’re worse than witchcraft, really.”

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“We’re only truly secure when we can look out our kitchen window and see our food growing and our friends working nearby.”

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 Cover Image:  Flickr Nicolás Boullosa

Article by Andrew Martin editor of Oneness Publishing and author of Rethink Your World Your Future…

 


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‘Introduction to Permaculture’ course in Hull

Have you heard about permaculture? If you’re interested in organic gardening you may have heard about it. Permaculture is a fairly simple idea, using nature as a template which is focused on finding solutions and is not just about gardening. Come along to Lausanne’s introductory weekend course to learn more and get a good grounding. Contact her on 07816 141169 or see poster for more details.

introduction-to-permaculture

Click on poster to enlarge


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Inspiring ‘ACTION’ film night

Inspiring ‘action’ films showing on the Boulevard. The next Hull Permaculture Network & Transition Hull and will be held on:-
 
Mon 8 Feb, 7.45pm @ Boulevard Village Hall, HU3 2UE
 
The meeting will use short films and discussion as a way of exploring beneficial links between permaculture and transition. There will be light refreshments and everyone is welcome to attend and have their views heard.
film-night2
 


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Cob oven meal

On Saturday 7th November, Pearson Park Wildlife Garden hosted the official launch of their new cob oven. It had been started way back in 2014 and taken several long hard sessions (see 31st May & 11th July) to reach completion, the launch had been eagerly awaited. The team had been sure to let the oven dry out properly over several months before removing the sand dome from within. (click on photos to enlarge).

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Community Officer Harriet Linfoot had already fired it up several times in the preceding weeks, so knew the ins and out of the oven. She had spent some time getting it ready during the morning’s wet conditions.

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Morning rain gave way to a bright and breezy afternoon and by the time most people began arriving at 12:30, Harriet had got it up to temperature and ready for baking. She had also brought some home-made dough, as had event organiser Lausanne, along with a selection of toppings for people to try.

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The hot embers in the oven were then pushed aside to make way for baking. Harriet then gave us a brief demonstration of how to roll out the dough and decorate the pizza bases, advising us not to over-do it with toppings. She then took her unbaked pizza over to the oven on a peel for baking, semolina being put under it to make sure it didn’t stick. Baking took no longer than 5 minutes, including a turn half way through to ensure of an even bake. As we stood back with eager anticipation, a sizzling cheese and tomato pizza was taken out to all-round approval.

The rest of the group, now ravenous with hunger, then proceeded to roll out and prepare their own pizzas.

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Event organiser Lausanne made sure everyone had been well catered for before being one of the last to get baking. Here she is, sweating over the hot oven – peel in hand baking her pizza, Harriet offering advice.

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Everyone enjoyed their hot lunch in the open air, and it was clean plates all round – not a morsel left! However some pizzas had turned out a little better than others, with one or two toppings being lost to the flames, several pizzas turning out slightly charred and others being served up with a side-portion of ash… but that only added to the fun!

The event was a great success and everyone who attended went home well fed. Thanks to everyone who participated in the construction of the oven and came along for the meal.

JP